FLOWERS OF LOVE

www.thecure.cz

The Cure on Press (1982)


New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

Polls.

New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

Polls.

P.S.S.T! (UK)


INFO

Reader's letter.

Unknown Magazine (UK)


INFO

Small article which begins with: "Finally, congrats to Undercurrents... includes interviews with Dave Wakeling, The Cure..." written by Cynthia Rose.

NME, MM, RM or Sounds ???

New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

In the section "Errol" is mention about The Cure.


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Dzuboks (Yugoslavia)


INFO

Interview with Simon Gallup and Lol Tolhurst entitled "Morbidna psihodelija". 2 pages

Leb I Sol on the cover.

New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

News article entitled "Cure tour for the sake of Pornography?". "Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer" with Billy Mackenzie which mentions The Cure.


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Record Mirror (UK)


INFO

Reader's letter entitled "Cold Cure".


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New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

News article entitled "The complete Cure - Rest of UK dates are now finalised".

Haircut 100 on the cover.


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Sounds (UK)


INFO

News article entitled "Taking on the world".


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Scan is available at Boys are Forever Drowning in Pornography website. Originally from Pictures Of You website.

Smash Hits (UK)



INFO

Interview with The Associates entitled "The art of parties" written by Johnny Black which mentions The Cure.


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Melody Maker (UK)


INFO

News article entitled "The Cure At Large" with UK tour dates.

Nick Heyward on the cover.

New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

News article entitled "Cure changes" about the UK tour.


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Flexipop! (UK)



INFO

Charts entitled "Fallout Favourites" with Robert Smith.

Date ???


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Melody Maker (UK)


INFO

UK tour advert.

Marine Girls on the cover.


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New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

News article entitled "Jobson on Cure outing" about the tour. UK tour advert.

Junior Giscombe on the cover.


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Sounds (UK)


INFO

UK tour advert.

Melody Maker (UK)


INFO

UK tour advert.

British Electric Foundation on the cover.


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New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

UK tour advert.

The Beat on the cover.


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Record Mirror (UK)


INFO

News article about the release of Pornography.


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Melody Maker (UK)


INFO

Gig guide with the picture of The Cure.

Spandau Ballet on the cover.


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New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

Interview with Siouxsie entitled "Banshai!" written by Paul Du Noyer which mentions The Cure. Gig guide.

Siouxsie on the cover.


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Sounds (UK)


INFO

Pornography album review entitled "Filth hounds" written by Dave McCullough.

Anvil on the cover.


TRANSCRIPT

Filth hounds

The title is appalling, the music inside is terribly icy the whole way though, and as an entinty in time in space and rock criticism the Cure are in themselves a dreadfully easy target. Are they part of the New Progressives? The production is so horrible and obvious, it makes you wonder, is R Smith all that clever really? In short, the mistakes the Cure make are as clear as the fractured daylight the Imaginary Boys themselves like so to chat about.

If they'd called the thing 'Dirty Books' or 'Filth' or something slightly more poetic it would make the whole lp better. As it is that initial, fatal misnomer sums up the Cure as a symptom. If Simple Minds are the SDP of rock then poor Cure are the equivalent of Mary Whitehouse. The title! Sheer Whitehousian! The problem is, R Smith has a grasp of the truth all right, but he transmits it in a a manner that is doomed from the outside.

On 'Porn' (that's better!) the Cure sound like a chunky New Order. Like the middle class boys they are, they are prone to the most overt plagiarism, which naturally leads to that one single main motive of the Cure/Smithian oeuvre. Guilt.

Smith sings about 'never being clean again' and 'will somebody give me the (wait for it Curefans) Cure'. We know what he means! He means well, he has talent, at the bottom of this heavy handed, sub NO and (still) sub Banshees stodge, there is a genuine pop talent still at work.

But the Cure have a knack of sounding like artifice of the worst, the most blatant kind. I'd have to be very kind to like 'Porn', as liberal as a Cure fan. But the heavy handedness, the unfortunate turn of phrase, never mind the generally too obviously angst-sounding backing (a monotone of would-be despair), push the Cure to that periphery from whence they really ought to be trying to crawl.

'Porn', has too much music too cluttered a backing for Smith's well-intended observance. There are too many 'nice hi fi effects', there is a constant baulking away from the savage in the music, to project what Mr Smith has to say.

The last, title track, for instance, tries to copy Cab Voltaire, all shuddering tape noise. And they do it in an antiseptic, full-blown, blown-dry production! One is tempted to believe at such juncture that Mr Smith is doomed in his own unseeing wooly bourgeouis comforts.

'Porn' carries too much of an inward knowledge of the effect the music it's making will produce in its all too captured audience. It is already loaded with appreciative sighs of awe and wonder from its grammar school, studenty crowd of Cure fans. This is indeed a bad way to be in, again especially as Robert dear has talent (still). He ought to quit Surbiton and start dossing real soon.

'A Strange Day' is good though, mainly because it stops the sickly compulsiveness of the sound with a gap (Magic!). But even here the title is copied from New Order! In 'One Hundred Years' (these titles!) Smith is the m-c kid wanting to write 'War And Peace', and in 'Short Term Effect' he is the m-c kid copying the words of Maggie Thatcher.

While Cure fans are insidiously locked in the Cure (otherwise this musical crap wouldn't exist), Robert Smith seems locked in himself, a spiralling nightmare that leaves the Cure like (their once opponent) the Fall, a possible 'new progressive', making a pompous sounding music that is, when all's said and done, dryly meaningless.

by Dave McCullough


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Melody Maker (UK)


INFO

UK tour advert.

Blancmange on the cover.


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New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

UK tour advert. Gig guide.

The Associates on the cover.


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Smash Hits (UK)



INFO

Pornography album advert.


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Melody Maker (UK)


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Pornography album review entited "Blue movies" written by Adam Sweeting.

The Blasters on the cover.


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New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

Brighton (21/4/1982) show review entitled "Savage scream of birth" written by Richard Cook. Pornography album advert.

Boy George on the cover.


TRANSCRIPT

Savage scream of birth

Like any valid pallative The Cure have not stood still inside the age that gave them birth. To meet even more blunt, oppressive times they have made themselves grow equally fearsome. These boys with very white knuckles and an awful lot on their minds...

By and unjust twist, The Cure have always appeared behind the times. As 'Shot By Both Sides' was ushering in a guantlet of ideas of unprecedented daring they suggested instead the similarly sophisticated but paradoxically primitive 'Killing An Arab' as their opening shot. It initiated a train of thought that ran crucially askew with its times, culminating in the stifling, repressive luxuriance of 'Faith' last year, the reverse face of Joy Division's shocked currency of despair: when Robert Smith sang of a funeral party he made sure the image was frozen inside and irresistibly strong melodic climate. It rang with a contrary decadence.

That strain of resolute melancholy was, though, a painful expression at a time when pop was reasserting its material states that The Cure have taken the hardest road - they have responded by increasing, not slackening off an assault powered by an almost ecstatic vitriol. Their current tour, of which this was an early gig, is set to pitilessly lambast their audience.

But then, what is Robert Smith singing about? I doubt if his listeners know and I'm not sure I do. I certainly found it impossible to distinguish lyric structure in the current Cure songcycle, although I do have some ideas on it, and Smith's thunderous, adenoidal tenor speaks at a single level: wired, all through. It's easy to be obsessed by Smith in a live situation, stubbornly static and spellbound by his microphone; but it is the unity of The Cure that pinions the attention.

This is a search for an electric music that bludgeons, hacks and stabs at the greyness The Cure have always had cast over them - and for one that also has a shy, squishy core of acoustic sweetness hiding within. An impossible collusion, of course, and the songs from 'Pornography' imply that they've gone for broke on a breed of aural violence that finally unshackles the savagery tht has always slept inside The cure. Yet Smith is reluctant to surrender the germ of pop in his fibre.

It's all very skillfully deployed: a bruisingly clear sound of scathing force, a clockwork, Pavlovian lightshow, a variegation of light and shade in the song order that builds to the unmitigating force of 'Pornography' itself as the climax. The Cure invest their earlier work with a tautness that reviatlises their interest in songs that they know too well - after all, 'Primary' and 'Faith' remain conceptions of gravid power - and use them as practice courts for the ever darker tones of the 'Pornography' music.

Some of which is brutally disturbing. 'One Hundred Years' is tortuously strung across guidelines of synthesised menace, the combative tensions of Smith's guitar and Gallup's bass and a vocal of epic velocity; but it's 'Pornography' that swamps everything that went before. Prefaced by an indecipherable babel of voices the instruments gradually grow up and intensify to an endless pitched scream and Smith's harrowing voice guts its way inside before the edifice cracks. The tapes jabber on as the group disappear. The encore of '10.15 Saturday Night', a beautiful unrequited tragedy, was flawlessly delivered as if in relief of exorcism.

The Cure felt dissatisfied with this performance; Smith, on his birthday, looked dejected and tired. If this is second-string Cure then their best must be very close to the edge. By the time they reach Hammersmith there'll be few groups this live or this powerful.

by Richard Cook


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Record Mirror (UK)


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Pornography album advert (in this issue ???) and review by Sonia Ducie. Plymouth (18/4/1982) show review by Gary Hurr.


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Melody Maker (UK)


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London (1/5/1982) show review entitled "Still no cure for the Cure" by Steve Sutherland.

Junior Giscombe on the cover.


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New Musical Express (UK)


INFO

Pornography album review entitled "Cold turkeys" written by Dave Hill.

Iron Maiden on the cover.


TRANSCRIPT

Cold turkeys

It won't improve your social life, reveal any reasons or relieve you of your load; and The Cure's name takes on an ironic tinge in that this music provides and antidote to nothing much at all, athough it may clear out your system. But what 'Pornography' does show is that The Cure, taken in one gulp, with no questions asked, do have a certain flair for identifying symptoms.

Presumably, this record wins its title because it portrays and parades its currency of exposed futility and utterly naked fear with so few distractions or adornments, and so little sense of shame. It really piles it on.

The Cure have applied themselves to catching a related collection of the very purest feelings endemeic to their age, and holding them right on the spot in their intangible, unspecified, unmanageable and most unpleasantly real form. Here is an album written from the knife-edge of despair, and as a piece of craftsmanship in expressive sound, it is a very big, very harrowing achievement.

Each track varies only in melody and tempo from the others, the beat frequently pinned unnervingly near that of the heart. The drums, guitars, voice and production style are pressed scrupulously together in a murderous unity of surging textured mood. There are no subjects here which can be properly defined. Instead the accuracy is aimed at absolutely nebulous fears and confusions as felt rather than as observed. So it makes deeply subjective listening, although through tone and seeping snatches of words, the nature of the prevailing wind can scarcely be denied.

For more than one reason we are better off not picking about at particular parts of the whole. For one thing, too close a look at the poetic permutations to hand on the lyric sheet, taken with the occasionally irksome whine of Robert Smith, and he and his easily-stereotyped friends can quickly become the tiresomely self-analytical young 'sensitives' I've always feared The Cure might be. For those ambitious for profundity, vacuity is but a clumsy couplet away.

However, I feel that 'Pornography' was not designed to be objectified or probed, but taken en bloc as a very dense wash of emotional colour, portraying one soul on a leash, fighting back the panic in the dark. And, as such, it really works. The confessional returns, fragile, frightened, horribly forlorn, and very finely drawn. A killer of its kind.

Don't have too much fun, now.

by Dave Hill.


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Sounds (UK)


INFO

Bristol (20/4/1982) show review entitled "Conceptual error". Pornography album advert.

J. Geils on the cover.


TRANSCRIPT

Conceptual error

The art of meaningful entertainment is probably not best served by starting an evening with an ill illuminated and badly focussed amateur movie, but unfortunately it's the sort of thing you expect of the Cure. Hopelessly arty and introspective these three imaginary boys may be, but I'd always liked them a lot until I saw them live.

In our house we tend to play Cure albums in the early hours when the conversation's not quite dead or the booze has all gone. The mood is relaxed and reflective and the Cure's music matches it, a salient throbbing background sound. But in person, they bored the ass off me.

The Cure are in danger of becoming the Floyd of the 80's, whereby the performer is reduced to a distant shadow while the concept takes over. Whoever did the lights are worth every penny of their doubtlessly large fee, magnificent yet simple with immaculate use of spots, three screens and a bit of back projection, all made to look like there's nothing to it but with an almost Close Encounters type exhilaration inbuilt.

I started to feel strange almost as soon as the band came on. There was an adulatory rush to the front, everyone stood up in their seats and I wondered why. The Cure's music is passive rather than aggressive. You can't dance to it, yet here we all are on our feet. A feeling of absurdity overcame me as the spots suddenly worked against them and lit up the audience better than the house lights. Here we all stood like tombstones, like extras in Doctor Who, hypnotised by this week's bad guy and unable to give up the illusion - trapped.

With no release, I'm afraid. The Cure's sound is almost as self-parodying as Status Quo's. Every song has the unmistakeable stamp of identity on it, which is pretty much like saying that a lot of them sound the same. You get a hypnotic and unvariable beat with economic heavy sustain bass, intricate frazzled guitar and mercifully echoed vocals. It varies somewhat (synth and tapes etc) but in essence that's the Cure and you either take it or butt out.

I was for leaving, but duty and the lights held me till the encores. Sitting somewhat detached from the general acclaim by now I noticed that songs from 'Three Imaginary Boys' were the best received. 'Saturday Night' even had them bobbing with the rhythm and reciting the words. Maybe they felt like me, enjoying anything familiar just to keep the circulation going and the first album did seem to be the liveliest of the lot.

I imagine most of this crowd went home and analysed this gig for meaning and intent, technical ability, and artistic interpretation and gave them a good score. I'll still play them in the wee small hours, but highlights of our time they are not.

by RAB


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Smash Hits (UK)



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Pornography album review which begins with: "This is their gloomiest effort yet..." by Ian Cranna. London (3/5/1982) show review written by Rosalyn Chissick.


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Melody Maker (UK)


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Reader's letter entitled "No Cure for bad reviews" about the Pornography review from MM (1/5/1982).

Becky Bondage on the cover.


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Der Tagesspiegel (Germany)


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Article entitled "Dreitonkunstler - The Cure Im Metropol" written by Jochen Metzler. 1/2 page

Noise! (UK)


INFO

Picture of The Hanging Garden single (???).

Issue # 2 with Theatre Of Hate on the cover.

Melody Maker (UK)


INFO

Article entitled "Infected Cuts" written by Chris Goodbre.

Scritti Politti on the cover.

Musikexpress (Germany)



INFO

Pornography album review.

Melody Maker (UK)


INFO

Article entitled "1981: The Cocktail Class" with the mention about The Cure.

New Musical Express (UK)


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News article about the release of The Hanging Garden single.


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Record Mirror (UK)


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In the section "Private Files" written by Sunie is a mention about Simon Gallup.

Flexipop! (UK)



INFO

Article entitled "Welcome To The Working Week" written by Robert Smith. The Hanging Garden single advert and review. Also there is advert of next issue of Flexipop! with The Cure.


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Spex (Germany)


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Pornography album review.

Melody Maker (UK)


INFO

News article mentioning upcoming release of The Hanging Garden single.


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New Musical Express (UK)


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The Hanging Garden single review by Adrian Thrills.

Bananarama on the cover.


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New Musical Express (UK)


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The Hanging Garden single advert.

David Byrne of Talking Heads on the cover.


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Noise! (UK)


INFO

The Hanging Garden lyrics. The Hanging Garden single review which begins with: "Clever idea - an open out double single pack..." written by Karen Swayne.

Issue # 6 with Midge Ure on the cover.


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Smash Hits (UK)



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The Hanging Garden single advert.


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Record Mirror (UK)


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News article about The Associates with mention about Michael Dempsey.

Flexipop! (UK)



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Flexi disc with The Cure's Lament has been issued with this magazine.

New Musical Express (UK)


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News article entitled "Slowdive dancer".

Melody Maker (UK)


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In the section "Talk Talk Talk" is a picture of Robert Smith and Steve Severin.


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New Musical Express (UK)


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"Portrait Of The Artist As A Consumer" with Beki Bondage which mentions The Cure.

Melody Maker (UK)


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In the section "Talk Talk Talk" is a small mention about The Cure.


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New Musical Express (UK)


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News article entitled "Siouxsie, Adam Xmas date".

Melody Maker (UK)


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News article entitled "Siouxsie Cured!".


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New Musical Express (UK)


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News article entitled "McGeoch collapses, and Robert Smith to Siouxsie's rescue". And other news article about the release of Let's Go To Bed single. Gig guide with Siouxsie.

The Tube on the cover.


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Sounds (UK)


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News article about The Banshees which mentions Robert Smith.

Melody Maker (UK)


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Siouxsie & The Banshees (with Robert Smith) Birmingham show review entitled "Spellbound" by Steve Sutherland.


TRANSCRIPT

Spellbound

As if jinxed by their own audacious self-possession, the Banshees have only to mention live performance for some bolt from the blue to singe their well-laid plans. With Siouxsie's throat-scare so recently consigned to the realms of exaggeration and their antipathy towards touring duly relaxed, John McGeoch's nervous exhaustion suddenly threatened to jeopardise the deserved culmination of this, the most intensely transient period in the band's history.

But, for the second time in three frantic years, enter the Cure's Robert Smith on substitute guitar and, raising a curt two fingers to grinning fate, the Banshees shouldered the challenge and set out, determined to fulfil their commitments.

Opening in Brum before a young and curious crowd, they fired off the edge of their nerves, fed from the offal of first night jitters and boldly grafted Smith's underestimated embroidery into the gap left by McGeoch's missing articulacy.

True, it is hard not to wince at the overcompensation of Budgie's opening percussive salvo, hard not to writhe with anxiety as the Banshees sought to tap the tension and work through the temptation to play straight and safe into the richer rewards of radical redefinition.

Prepared, indeed determined, to take risks, a Banshees show never attempts a faithful translation from vinyl into flesh - they respect themselves too much for that! Rather, from the string trio's giddy introduction to "Fireworks" to the locomotive menace of "Sin In My Heart", the songs are stripped and stretched, unafraid to jettison the more delicate dimensions of the records for an urgent, animal insistence.

Light, film, costume, gesture and sound all gel into a unique experience. Certainly, tonight I saw, heard and felt what I never have before and never will again; the ritual, compelling sinews to stretch and lips to synch along with a danger and dignity that never casts the band in the role of performing puppets, not degrades the audience into Pavlovian disciples. One or two in front of me twitched to pogo, voices were raised requesting "Love In A Void". No-one got what they wanted, but no-one can have left disappointed.

Whether thrilled by the exquisite marriage of slides and imagery during the encore "Israel", chilled by the creeeping insistence of "Nightshift" or, like me, exhilerated as the tearing clutches of "Voodoo Dolly" relaxed into a beguiling caress and then suddenly snapped into a spitting curse, the crowd stood literally spellbound as the Banshees learned a new proficiency, realised the fact and began probing further.

Tonight they touched brilliance briefly - more than most bands ever do. Beware and rejoice, there's far more to come and a long way to go.

by Steve Sutherland


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New Musical Express (UK)


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Let's Go To Bed single advert.

Eddy Grant on the cover.


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Sounds (UK)


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Let's Go To Bed single advert.

Smash Hits (UK)



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Let's Go To Bed single advert.


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Melody Maker (UK)


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Let's Go To Bed single review by Nick Cave & The Birthday Party.


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Sounds (UK)


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Let's Go To Bed single advert.

Record Mirror (UK)


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Let's Go To Bed single advert.

Date ???


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Unknown Magazine (UK)


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Let's Go To To Bed single advert and review.

Date ??? NME, MM, RM or Sounds ???


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Zig Zag (UK)



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Article entitled "Beautiful Dreamer" written by John Wilde.


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Melody Maker (UK)


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Siouxsie & The Banshees (with Robert Smith) London show review entitled "The Banshee Dream" written by Lynden Barber.


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New Musical Express (UK)


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Siouxsie & The Banshees (with Robert Smith) London show review entitled "Spectacular Siouxsie" written by Paul Du Noyer.

Simple Minds on the cover.


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Smash Hits (UK)



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Lyrics to Let's Go To Bed.


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Record Mirror (UK)


INFO

Interview with Robert Smith entitled "Bedtime stories" written by Mark Cooper. News article entitled "McGeoch Returns" which mentions Robert Smith.

Paul Weller of The Jam on the cover.


TRANSCRIPT

Bedtime stories

If you were to bump into Robert Smith today, chances are he'd tell you that he'd "completely lost track of the central core of the Cure."

If you were to ask him if this was a worry, he'd probably wax cosmic and claim that really, "Nothing's worrying is it?" Robert always has an eye on the larger questions, the ultimate truths.

Recently, Robert Smith came to the end of his tether. While the record company continued to pester him to write some pop songs, the Cure set off on yet another European tour. Robert had a crisis.

"There's a lot of things I'd rather do than trek around countries being drunk and playing to drunk people. The last tour was like a re-run of the worst movie you've ever seen. It's as if you're leaning against a wall eyes closed, and when you come to, you're in the same place you were a year before."

"You see your own graffiti up in the dressing rooms and the next band's posters replacing yours as you leave town. We were cracking up so the people offstage began to fall apart as well. 23 people reverting to primitives is not a pretty sight; we were more like a rugby tour than a Cure tour..."

A year before, Robert had sworn he'd never play those venues again. Life in The Cure had begun to seem like a recurring nightmare. "I began to feel like some doddery old rock and roller who needed a few beers so he could go onstage and turn it on. Playing so many dates, it becomes almost impossible to create the necessary level of intensity every night. It got like when you really want to finish a chapter but your eyes keep closing..."

Robert walked off the tour and the Cure went missing. Simon Gallup left the group while Lol Tolhurst left his drums and began taking synth lessons in Clapham. Robert despaired about the whole affair. "I despaired about the whole business, being in a band, being involved in the music bit. After a while it takes over and you can't see out of it. It's important to me to have a sense of myself be a person outside of all of this, a sense of myself as a person not just a member of the group." While Robert attempted to rediscover himself, he got a call from his old friends the Banshees. In five days he was touring with them - and loving it! "There's only three bands I'd play for. Only New Order, the Bunnymen and the Banshees have that sense of purpose. It's a pleasure for me not to be the center of attention: if I look up from the guitar, people aren't staring at me. All I miss is not singing.

Last week the Cure released a single with a lot more poppy moments than we'd come to expect form the Cure. They made a video which featured Lol dancing like one of Tears For Fears and gave the general impression they were bidding to become a modern-day pop group. Could this be the Cure?

At first, it seems as if Robert barely remembers. "I've become divorced from the name of the Cure over the last three months because nothing I've done has had anything to do with it. Talking an old toy or a game whose rules you've forgotten..."

"Let's Go To Bed" changes the rules for the Cure. Naturally, Robert is unhappy with the change. "I don't think it's a Cure song. I wanted it released under a different name like we did with "Cult Hero" a couple of years ago. It's not that Cure songs are a formula but they do share a central core. This single has been released to get major daytime radio play."

"It's disappointing to me because it's the first time we've been seen to be involved in current trends or fashions. There's probably only a few thousand people who've held us up as an example to themselves but if I were one of them, I'd feel let down. For us to be seen to be bothering to compete in an arena I don't respect upsets me. When you spend time in a band trying to achieve certain goals, you don't want to betray them."

Robert has no ambitions to become a pop star. "We've always catered for minorities, not from a sense of elitism but because I just don't have a finger on public taste. I can't see why anyone would want to buy any of the singles in the top 10 when I spend my time turning them off when they come on the radio.

The early Cure of "Killing An Arab" were known as a pop band. The companies behind Robert would be pleased to see him revert to type. "For the first time I'm conscious of being seen as someone who could make money and I resent it. At first they respected me for not wanting to write hits, then they saw me as some kind of halfwit and now they're trying to goad me by saying I can't do it anyway. I suppose I've let them get to me with "Let's Go To Bed". As you can see from the video, I don't take the song seriously and that's its saving grace. If I took it seriously, that would make it even more gross."

Robert Smith has all the problems of a highbrow in the marketplace. He's surprised that he's survived this far. The Cure are important to him but not as important as his sense of self. "Let's Go To Bed" does not announce a new direction for the Cure. "I said it wouldn't sell. If it does, I'll take even greater pleasure in never doing anything like it again." If the Cure are to survive, Robert will have to find their central core again.

Meanwhile, it's tough being a highbrow. "I don't despair about losing touch with the Cure. It's more despairing that I'll never attain the heights of a Bach or a Prokofiev..."

by Mark Cooper


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Melody Maker (UK)


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Interview with Robert Smith entitled "The Incurables" written by Steve Sutherland. Small article entitled "Post Mortem" (???).

Shalimar on the cover.


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Record Mirror (UK)



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Interview with Siouxsie entitled "Let's Get Physical" written by Mark Cooper.


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New Musical Express (UK)


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News articles entitled "Almond blossoms for Christmas" and "Smith stays in new-look Cure". Gig guide with The Banshees.


TRANSCRIPT

Smith stays in new-look Cure

The Cure have now slimmed down to duo size, comprising just Robert Smith and Laurence Tolhurst, and they'll have a four-track EP released in February. They are currently remixing and partly re-recording 12 of the group's earlier songs, which will form a "greatest hits" type of compilation, to be issued in the early spring - and at that time, they'll be playing selected dates with "chosen" musicians.

This burst of Cure activity seems to squash widespread speculation that Smith is to become a full-time Banshee. A Cure spokesman insisted at the weekend this is not the case, and that Smith is still "merely helping Siouxsie out".


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Disco 45 Songbook (UK)



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The Hanging Garden lyrics.

Date ???


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Disco 45 Songbook (UK)


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Small article entitled "Keep taking the tablets".

Date ???


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Melody Maker (UK)


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Small article entitled "Everything but the curls".

Date ??? MM ???


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* scan of this article is available at Pictures Of You website.

Sounds (UK)


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The Hanging Garden single advert.

Date ??? NME ???

Unknown Magazine (Germany)


INFO

Pornography album advert with tour dates.

Date ???

Unknown Magazine (UK)


INFO

Pornography album review.

Date ???


TRANSCRIPT

... a ponderous work, hampered somewhat by the turgid pop noir thematicism. Collectively the Cure say much by what they leave unsaid.- Trouser Press

It's downhill all the way, into ever-darkening shadows... passing through chilly marbled archways to the final rendezvous with the cold comfort of the slab.- Melody Maker

While Cure fans are insidiously locked in the Cure (otherwise this musical crap wouldn't exist), Robert Smith seems locked in himself, a spiraling nightmare that leaves the Cure making a pompous sounding music that is, when all's said and done, dryly meaningless.- Sounds

All too predictable, but still worth a listen.- Record Mirror

An album written from the knife-edge of despair, and as a piece of craftsmanship in expressive sound, it is a very big, very harrowing achievement.- New Musical Express

Unknown Magazine (UK)


INFO

News article which begins with: "The Cure are now down to duo following the departure of bassist Simon Gallup for reasons that haven't yet been explained...".

Date ??? NME, MM, RM or Sounds ???

Unknown Magazine (UK)


INFO

The Hanging Garden single review which begins with: "This week and 100 Years come from..." written by M.M.

Date ???

Unknown Magazine (UK)


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Article which begins with: "The Cure have never been in fashion...".

Date ???

Zig Zag (UK)


INFO

The Hanging Garden single review.

Date ???